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Protecting Groups

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Protecting Groups Einkaufswagen
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Autor: P.J. Kocienski
Auflage: 2005
Form: 680 Seiten, kartoniert
ISBN-10: 3131356030
ISBN-13: 978313135603-1
Verlag: Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Preis (EUR): 69.95
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Klappentext - Autorenporträt - Inhaltsverzeichnis - Rezension

Klappentext

This new edition of "Protecting Groups" by Philip Kocienski is a valuable addition to the synthetic chemist's bookshelf and will find an appreciative audience. It contains an enormous amount of valuable and highly organized information. It is beautifully and clearly written; a pleasure to read. The introductory chapter provides a sophisticated overview of the application of protecting groups in contemporary syntheses. At the heart of the book are seven chapters which deal authoritatively and thoroughly with the protection of the various core functional groups, from carbonyl to amino. The closing epilog rounds off the presentation with an insight into the realities of synthetic practice and twenty five problems for people who love to understand chemistry.
E. J. Corey

Philip Kocienski was born in Troy, New York in 1946. His love for organic chemistry, amply stimulated by Alfred Viola whilst an undergraduate at Northeastern University, was further developed at Brown University, where he obtained his PhD degree in 1971 under Joseph Ciabattoni. Postdoctoral study with George Büchi at MIT and later with Basil Lythgoe at Leeds University in England, confirmed his interest in the synthesis of natural products. He was appointed Brotherton Research Lecturer at Leeds in 1979 and Professor of Chemistry at Southampton University in 1985. He moved to the University of Glasgow in 1997 as Regius Professor of Chemistry. In 2000 he returned to Leeds as Professor of Organic Chemistry. He was awarded the Hickinbottom Fellowship and the Tilden, Simonsen and Pedlar Medals of the Royal Society of Chemistry. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1997 and Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1998. In 2000, he was elected a Foreign Member of the Polish Academy of Sciences.